So Much To Do, So Little Time!!!

cute asian girl

 

Hey everyone!

Well I am currently on Unit three of the Castilian Spanish language course from Rosetta Stone and progressing decently, at least in my opinion! I have also started Japanese, and am still early on in the first unit of Japanese language pack. Wow, what a difference! Spanish and English have a few similarities, but Japanese is from a whole another planet! It’s fun though, especially because it is so amazingly different from what I’ve been used to my whole life.

I am currently up to Algebra, Geometry and a few other things on Khan Academy.

Right now for the programming languages I am focusing on C, Python, and Java. But I am also working PHP, JavaScript, and a couple others in when I have time.

My first online course that I am actually registered for, begins in approx 15 days. It is a Greek and Roman Mythology course offered online by The University of Pennsylvania. I also start a Mathematical Thinking course soon, offered by Prof. Devlin of Stanford University.

I am of course still working on CS50 Fall 2011, and am registered for the online class CS50x, starting on October 15th, offered by edX.org and Prof. David J Malan.

Look for more updates soon and I will try to be more detailed next time, I just don’t have much time today.

Have a good one!

There Are 10 Types of People In This World…

base-2 math

… those who understand binary, and those who don’t! Today I thought I would share a video link with everyone that explains how binary works. If you don’t know, binary is how computers know what to do. At some level, everything the computer does is because of the binary base-2 number system. One and zero, on and off, true and false. This is because electricity is either flowing or it isn’t, so base-2 math of binary is logical and an essential part of computer science. Check out this fun video by Sal Khan of Khan Academy as he explains how binary mathematics works:

http://www.khanacademy.org/science/computer-science/v/binary-numbers

If Only I Had A Penny For Every Time…

Just a quick update on my foray into computer science and my studying of the CS50 open course ware at http://cs50.tv/2011/fall/

I am currently working on the problem set for Week One (course starts on Week 0, like a computer would), called Pennies. You have to write a script in the C programming language that calculate a user’s input of the month, and is based on the old wisdom tale of would you rather have a bag of money or start with a penny and your pennies double every day for a month? I think this is a take on a similar tale I heard from my father when I was a kid. Only in his example, it had something to do with Ancient China and a guy asking the king as payment if he could have one grain of rice on the first square of a chess board and which would double each square on the chess board. Of course the king laughed at him wanting rice on a chess board instead of gold or money, but if you do the math… that is a fortune in rice!

Now I am attempting the Hacker editions of the problem sets, so I also in addition to writing a C program that computes the pennies problem I have to also create a program that prompts a user for a credit card number and then determines if that credit card is valid or not, using an algorithm created by Hans Peter Luhn who was a Computer Science pioneer at IBM. But I won’t get into this problem set yet, I will explain it later when I get it to work correctly.

A third problem in the Hacker Edition is to create some sort of vertical bar chart, but I haven’t got that far yet, so, for those curious here is the basic instructions of the pennies.c problem set (more details in the PDF if you go to the cs50.tv site):

Implement, in a file called pennnies.c, a program that first asks the user how many days there are in the month and then asks the user how many pennies he or she will receive on the first day of that month. The program should then calculate the amount that the user will have received in total by the end of the month (not just on the last day) if that amount is doubled on every day but the first, expressed not as pennies but as dollars and cents, with dollars formatted with commas every three digits. If the user does not type in 28, 29, 30, or 31 for the number of days in the month, the program should prompt the user to retry. If the user does not imput a positive integer for the first day’s number of pennies, the program should prompt the user to rety.

For instance, your program might behave as follows, whereby boldfaced text represents some user’s input.

jharvard@appliance (~/hacker1): ./pennies
Days in month: 32
Days in month: 31
Pennies on first day: 1
$21,474,836.47